October Events for Everyone at Dexter District Library

Fall is always a great time at the Library with a variety of educational and fun programs for adults, teens and kids of all ages. This October we have a wide assortment of events for everyone.

This fall, the Library is presenting a Healthy Speaker Series with a variety of speakers and topics related to living a healthy, active life.  The series is presented in conjunction with the Dexter Wellness Coalition and the 5 Healthy Towns Foundation.  On Tuesday, October 2 at 6:30 pm, join Dr. Scott Becker as he presents This is Your Brain Online.  Dr. Becker, an Academic Research Specialist from Michigan State University, will discuss how a growing body of research from a variety of disciplines indicates the wide-spread use of screen time has negative health effects.  The use of digital technology including computers, the internet, video games, and smart phones has been shown to impact the human brain and change our moods, concentration, memory and ability to sleep and learn. Registration is recommended, call 734-426-4477.

First Tuesday Lego Club will meet on October 2 from 4:00 to 5:00 pm.  Kids in grades K through 8 are invited to spend an afternoon making their own Lego creations while visiting with old friends and making new ones.  Everyone is welcome, Legos will be provided by the Library.  Registration is not required.

Stop by for Drop-In Family Story Times every Thursday in October at 10:30 am. Family Story Times are geared for ages six and under but everyone is welcome to attend. Daycare centers may join us and are asked to arrive early. Each session lasts approximately 30 minutes. Drop-In Story Times include picture, pop-up and interactive books, flannel-board stories, songs, puppets, finger plays, crafts and other activities that encourage a love of reading to your child.

On Thursday, October 4 the American Red Cross Blood Drive will be at the Library from 1:00 to 7:00 pm.  The Red Cross is working around the clock to provide help for the hundreds of thousands of people impacted by Hurricane Florence. The Red Cross is urging blood donors in unaffected areas to give now to keep the blood supply strong after the storms forced more than 170 blood drives to cancel.  To schedule an appointment, visit: http://redcrossblood.org (sponsor code: dexterlibrary) or call 1-800-RED-CROSS (1-800-733-2767).  You may also call Library Director Paul McCann at the Library at 734-426-4477, or contact him at pmccann@dexter.lib.mi.us, to register.

Back-To-School Crafts returns to the Library on Saturday, October 6 from 11:00 am to 12:00 pm.  Kids and teens in grades 3 through 8 will discover creative ways to decorate their lockers and embellish their school supplies.  Registration is required, call the Youth Reference Desk at 734-436-4477.

Personalized Medicine comes to the Library on Tuesday, October 9 at 7:00 pm. Join Betty Chaffee, Pharm.D., for a discussion on the role individual genetics play in the way medications work.  Learn how your genes can help you live the best life possible.   Chaffee will discuss testing methods, how results are interpreted and used and why this process can be crucial in the treatment of common health problems. This program is presented in conjunction with the Dexter Wellness Coalition, registration is recommended.

On Friday, October 12 at 10:00 am, the Library will host a Morning Movie for Preschoolers.  Children ages five and under, along with their caregiver, are invited to stop by and enjoy Pooh’s Heffalump Halloween Movie on the big screen.  Bring a pillow and stuffed friend, preschool snacks will be served, registration is not required.

Mindfulness Meditation returns on Saturday, October 13 from 9:30 to 10:30 am.  Join us for guided mindfulness meditation in a safe, positive, friendly group setting.  These drop-in sessions are open to all and have no religious affiliation.  Sessions will include short presentations by the instructor, technique coaching, silent meditation and time for discussion and questions.  Sessions will be led by different instructors who include Diane Morse, Doreen Murasky and Jeanette Brooks.  No experience is necessary.

Teens in grades 7 through 12 are invited to join our Teen Advisory Group (TAG) on Saturday, October 13 at 11:00 am. This group meets monthly to brainstorm new programs, book selections and how to make the Library a great place. This is a fun way to earn volunteer hours. Pizza will be served and registration is required.

Boost your energy with Healthy Smoothies.  On Tuesday, October 16 at 7:00 pm, join Yoga in the Park leader and Mill Creek Assistant Principal, Brett Pedersen, to learn about the best blending equipment, how to extract the most nutrients and discover great ingredients used to make healthy, delicious smoothies.  Tips on shopping, tasting samples and recipes to take home will be provided.  This program is presented in partnership with the Dexter Wellness Coalition, registration is recommended.

Saturday, October 20 at 11:00 am brings Wild Swan Theater to the Library for a special presentation of Frog and Toad.  Based on Arnold Lobel’s wonderful stories by the same name, Frog and Toad will captivate children of all ages.  Kids will recognize some of the dramatized episodes, such as Toad’s efforts to hurry along his garden by speaking poetry to his seeds, or the difficulties Frog and Toad face trying not to eat ALL the delicious cookies Toad has baked.   Registration is not required, everyone is welcome.

Winter Outdoor Fun for all ages comes to the Library on October 23 at 6:30 pm.  Join representatives from the Eddy Discovery Center, Huron-Clinton Metroparks and REI for this wide-ranging program.  Katie McGlashen, from the Eddy Discover Center will discuss winter wildlife viewing and track identification.  The Outdoor School staff from REI will present a variety of outdoor equipment and clothing layering techniques to help you maximize the winter months.  Kim Fix from the Huron-Clinton Metroparks will discuss the wide variety of opportunities the parks offer to stay active during the winter months. This program is presented in partnership with the Dexter Wellness Coalition, registration is recommended.

Makerspace returns on October 25 at 4:00 pm.  This is a drop-In program for grades K through 8.  Make, build, craft and explore.  Participate in a variety of open-ended activities.  We supply the materials and you supply the imagination. Registration is not required.

On Friday, October 26 from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm, the Library will host a Flu Shot Clinic. The Dexter Pharmacy will visit the Library to provide flu shots, no appointments are necessary. Be sure to bring your insurance information. The Pharmacy will process insurance on site and follow up with any billing. The Clinic will take place in the Library’s Lower Level Meeting Rooms.

Teens in grades 6 through 12 are invited to join us for Magic: The Gathering on Friday, October 26 from 6:00 to 8:30 pm.  Magic is a card-based game of strategy, played by two or more players.  We will play MTG games and serve pizza.  Prizes will be awarded to the top players, prior knowledge of game rules is required.  This event is co-sponsored with SRSLY Dexter.  Call 734-426-4477 to register.

Drop-In Halloween Story Time will be held on Saturday, October 27 at 11:00 am. Join us for 30 minutes of stories and music celebrating Halloween. Geared for children ages six and under but everyone is welcome. A simple craft will be provided following the program. Registration is not required.

Don’t forget to visit us in Monument Park on Wednesday, October 31 from 1:00 to 4:00 pm when the Library participates in the Chamber of Commerce event Downtown Dexter Trick or Treat.  Stop by our table and pick up some Library treats.

Dexter District Library is located at 3255 Alpine Street in Dexter. All programs are free and open to everyone. For additional information, visit our website at www.dexter.lib.mi.us.

Instant Pot Cooking for Adults, Teens and Tweens

Adults, teens and tweens in grades 5 and up are invited to enjoy an afternoon with Mary Spencer of Taste: A Cook’s Place in Northville.  Join us on Saturday, December 8 from 1:00 to 2:30 pm as Mary creates a variety of holiday dishes and desserts using her assortment of Instant Pots, the recent, popular cooking trend.  This class is demonstration style but participants will get to enjoy samplings of all the dishes presented by Mary and her assistant.  Registration begins November 1 in the Teen Zone or by calling 734-426-4477.

New Library Catalog Information

As of May 29th, the Library now has a new shared online catalog and checkout system.  In addition to the features you love about our previous catalog, the new system will offer easier searching, more relevant results, a kids catalog, innovative account features, effortless integration with eBooks and eAudio, and a new mobile catalog.

All of your holds were automatically transferred to the new system. After May 29th, library PINs will be restricted to six or less numbers. Any patrons who currently have a PIN that contains letters or are larger than six numbers will be assigned the last four digits of their phone numbers. When logging into your account in the new catalog, you will also have the option to create an EZ username and password.

In order to facilitate the transition, access to the MeLcat services is currently suspended.  Items borrowed through MeLcat may not be renewed and must be returned.  We hope to have this service restored at some point before Fall 2018, but have not received a firm date from the Michigan e-Library staff.

This will be a time of learning for our staff.  From placing holds and cataloging new items, to tracking down misplaced books and paying fines, this information will change where it resides in our system, will name things differently and our staff will need to learn it all in a short period of time.  We ask for your patience as we navigate this transition and will do our best to maintain our standard of service during this time.

Tips to Ensure Receipt of Library Email Notices

Additional updates:

6/29 – Some patrons have reported they are still not receiving notifications for items coming due.  The notification system is functioning.  Our cooperative has reported it is receiving a number of return messages noting the recipient’s e-mail does not recognize the sender.  if you have set up spam controls, please check your e-mail’s spam or junk folder and authorize receipt of e-mail from LibraryNotice@tln.lib.mi.us.   Please also log on to your library account (using your Library card number and PIN) and verify your correct e-mail address is on file.

For those of you who miss the BookMyne app, the new catalog handles mobile access in a different manner.  The new catalog, produced by the TLC company, has a different method of coding for web layout. The new catalog incorporates ‘responsive design’ principles, which change the shape and layout of the full catalog, based on the screen size any particular patron is using. As I understand, the main advantage is that, without a mediating app, any patron with any device will be interacting directly with the catalog and his or her account. Screen size, operating system, etc., do not play a part because the catalog is accessed through a browser like Chrome or Safari and coding for browsers eliminates the need to make sure the code of the app remains in concert with coding for the web catalog.  Your device should allow you to create a bookmark, favorite or shortcut that can appear as a tile on your home screen and provide direct access to the catalog.  Android instructions can be found here: https://www.wikihow.com/Set-a-Bookmark-Shortcut-in-Your-Home-Screen-on-Android and iOS instructions can be found here: https://www.icaew.com/en/adding-an-iphone-shortcut.  Currently, the ‘remember me’ function seems to be working with Android devices only and a fix is coming for iOS devices.  Once these methods are fully functional, the tile should work much the same way as the former app.

6/11 – The Library has made our cooperative aware that the e-mail notification system is not working properly and escalated this ticket to the highest priority.  We do appreciate how much people depend on this notification and are working hard to make sure this functions as expected.  When this is fixed, the new system will send the customary notice of items to be returned, three days (3) before they are due.  The system does not currently send a second message on the day items are due, so please heed the early reminders in order to avoid overdue items.

If you have opted in to text messaging to receive notifications, you will need to visit your account and set your carrier.  The new text messaging service uses an e-mail over text system to eliminate text message charges.  There is a large list of carriers.  The general recommendation is to pick the larger carrier at the top of the list.  If you do not receive text messages, please verify your carrier with your service provider.  We can request additional carriers be added to the list as necessary.

The new system has set a standard time frame for hold pickup.  The new period will be seven (7) days from the date requested items arrive here in Dexter.  This is a system-wide setting and is designed to help speed up filling all holds for everyone throughout our partner libraries.

In order to access the “My Account” features, you will need your bar code from your Library card and your PIN number.  In our new system, PIN numbers must be four to six numeric digits.  If your previous pin was a combination of letters and/or special characters, these have been converted to the last four digits of your phone number.  If you have any trouble accessing your account, staff can reset your PIN, but the new system does not allow us to see your current PIN.

If you have opted in to text messaging to receive notifications, you will need to visit your account and set your carrier.  The new text messaging service uses an e-mail over text system to eliminate text message charges.  There is a large list of carriers.  The general recommendation is to pick the larger carrier at the top of the list.  If you do not receive text messages, please verify your carrier with your service provider.  We can request additional carriers be added to the list as necessary.

 

Photoshop Elements 2018 Now Available

Adobe Photoshop Elements 2018 is now available on all of our public lab PCs upstairs.

Features of Photoshop Elements 2018 include:
Hassle free organization

  • Go from hundreds of mystery folders to a visual view of your photos and videos — automatically.
  • Easily find your photos and videos with automatic sorting and visual tagging.
  • See your best photos auto-curated based on quality, faces, subjects, and more.

Intelligent Editing

  • Open closed eyes in photos like magic and make selections effortlessly.
  • Automatically bring together the best scenes in your videos with Smart Trim, and auto-extract photos from your raw footage with Candid Moments. 
  • Get step-by-step help with creative photo and video techniques and effects. 

Stunning Creations

  • Totally reimagined slideshows bring together curated photos and short clips with one click.
  • Make printed photo artwork, collages, and gifts.
  • Add style to your videos with titles, effects, transitions, and themes.

 

Zoo Boo at the Detroit Zoo

October 5-7, 12-14 and 19-21
Fridays and Saturdays 5-8 p.m.   Sundays 3-7 p.m.

Zoo Boo, presented by Beaumont Children’s, is the Detroit Zoo’s merry-not-scary Halloween celebration. This annual event has been reimagined to bring even more excitement to kids of all ages. Exhilarating live entertainment awaits your little ones including dazzling acrobatics and silk performances, daring fire acts, amazing magic shows, jugglers, live music, extreme pumpkin carving and smashing demonstrations, story tellers and Disney/Pixar’s Coco, a vibrant tale of family, fun and adventure. Enjoy fabulous Halloween displays along the “unlucky” 13-station trick-or-treat trail.

Tickets start at $10 per person. Children under 2 are admitted free! TICKETS MUST BE PURCHASED 24 HOURS IN ADVANCE OF INTENDED DATE. OFFER NOT VALID FOR DAY-OF-EVENT PURCHASE. Prices and operating schedule subject to change without notice. Offer cannot be combined with other promotions. Zoo Boo is a rain-or-shine event. No refunds or exchanges. Parking not included. Parking is $8 per car for DZS members and non-members.

Click here to buy tickets.

Nobel Prize Winners in Literature

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2017
Kazuo Ishiguro
“who, in novels of great emotional force, has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2016
Bob Dylan
“for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2015
Svetlana Alexievich
“for her polyphonic writings, a monument to suffering and courage in our time”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2014
Patrick Modiano
“for the art of memory with which he has evoked the most ungraspable human destinies and uncovered the life-world of the occupation”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2013
Alice Munro
“master of the contemporary short story”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2012
Mo Yan
“who with hallucinatory realism merges folk tales, history and the contemporary”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2011
Tomas Tranströmer
“because, through his condensed, translucent images, he gives us fresh access to reality”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2010
Mario Vargas Llosa
“for his cartography of structures of power and his trenchant images of the individual’s resistance, revolt, and defeat”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2009
Herta Müller
“who, with the concentration of poetry and the frankness of prose, depicts the landscape of the dispossessed”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2008
Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio
“author of new departures, poetic adventure and sensual ecstasy, explorer of a humanity beyond and below the reigning civilization”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2007
Doris Lessing
“that epicist of the female experience, who with scepticism, fire and visionary power has subjected a divided civilisation to scrutiny”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2006
Orhan Pamuk
“who in the quest for the melancholic soul of his native city has discovered new symbols for the clash and interlacing of cultures”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2005
Harold Pinter
“who in his plays uncovers the precipice under everyday prattle and forces entry into oppression’s closed rooms”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2004
Elfriede Jelinek
“for her musical flow of voices and counter-voices in novels and plays that with extraordinary linguistic zeal reveal the absurdity of society’s clichés and their subjugating power”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2003
John M. Coetzee
“who in innumerable guises portrays the surprising involvement of the outsider”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2002
Imre Kertész
“for writing that upholds the fragile experience of the individual against the barbaric arbitrariness of history”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2001
Sir Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul
“for having united perceptive narrative and incorruptible scrutiny in works that compel us to see the presence of suppressed histories”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2000
Gao Xingjian
“for an æuvre of universal validity, bitter insights and linguistic ingenuity, which has opened new paths for the Chinese novel and drama”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1999
Günter Grass
“whose frolicsome black fables portray the forgotten face of history”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1998
José Saramago
“who with parables sustained by imagination, compassion and irony continually enables us once again to apprehend an elusory reality”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1997
Dario Fo
“who emulates the jesters of the Middle Ages in scourging authority and upholding the dignity of the downtrodden”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1996
Wislawa Szymborska
“for poetry that with ironic precision allows the historical and biological context to come to light in fragments of human reality”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1995
Seamus Heaney
“for works of lyrical beauty and ethical depth, which exalt everyday miracles and the living past”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1994
Kenzaburo Oe
“who with poetic force creates an imagined world, where life and myth condense to form a disconcerting picture of the human predicament today”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1993
Toni Morrison
“who in novels characterized by visionary force and poetic import, gives life to an essential aspect of American reality”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1992
Derek Walcott
“for a poetic oeuvre of great luminosity, sustained by a historical vision, the outcome of a multicultural commitment”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1991
Nadine Gordimer
“who through her magnificent epic writing has – in the words of Alfred Nobel – been of very great benefit to humanity”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1990
Octavio Paz
“for impassioned writing with wide horizons, characterized by sensuous intelligence and humanistic integrity”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1989
Camilo José Cela
“for a rich and intensive prose, which with restrained compassion forms a challenging vision of man’s vulnerability”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1988
Naguib Mahfouz
“who, through works rich in nuance – now clear-sightedly realistic, now evocatively ambiguous – has formed an Arabian narrative art that applies to all mankind”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1987
Joseph Brodsky
“for an all-embracing authorship, imbued with clarity of thought and poetic intensity”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1986
Wole Soyinka
“who in a wide cultural perspective and with poetic overtones fashions the drama of existence”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1985
Claude Simon
“who in his novel combines the poet’s and the painter’s creativeness with a deepened awareness of time in the depiction of the human condition”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1984
Jaroslav Seifert
“for his poetry which endowed with freshness, sensuality and rich inventiveness provides a liberating image of the indomitable spirit and versatility of man”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1983
William Golding
“for his novels which, with the perspicuity of realistic narrative art and the diversity and universality of myth, illuminate the human condition in the world of today”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1982
Gabriel García Márquez
“for his novels and short stories, in which the fantastic and the realistic are combined in a richly composed world of imagination, reflecting a continent’s life and conflicts”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1981
Elias Canetti
“for writings marked by a broad outlook, a wealth of ideas and artistic power”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1980
Czeslaw Milosz
“who with uncompromising clear-sightedness voices man’s exposed condition in a world of severe conflicts”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1979
Odysseus Elytis
“for his poetry, which, against the background of Greek tradition, depicts with sensuous strength and intellectual clear-sightedness modern man’s struggle for freedom and creativeness”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1978
Isaac Bashevis Singer
“for his impassioned narrative art which, with roots in a Polish-Jewish cultural tradition, brings universal human conditions to life”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1977
Vicente Aleixandre
“for a creative poetic writing which illuminates man’s condition in the cosmos and in present-day society, at the same time representing the great renewal of the traditions of Spanish poetry between the wars”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1976
Saul Bellow
“for the human understanding and subtle analysis of contemporary culture that are combined in his work”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1975
Eugenio Montale
“for his distinctive poetry which, with great artistic sensitivity, has interpreted human values under the sign of an outlook on life with no illusions”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1974
Eyvind Johnson
“for a narrative art, far-seeing in lands and ages, in the service of freedom”

Harry Martinson
“for writings that catch the dewdrop and reflect the cosmos”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1973
Patrick White
“for an epic and psychological narrative art which has introduced a new continent into literature”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1972
Heinrich Böll
“for his writing which through its combination of a broad perspective on his time and a sensitive skill in characterization has contributed to a renewal of German literature”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1971
Pablo Neruda
“for a poetry that with the action of an elemental force brings alive a continent’s destiny and dreams”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1970
Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn
“for the ethical force with which he has pursued the indispensable traditions of Russian literature”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1969
Samuel Beckett
“for his writing, which – in new forms for the novel and drama – in the destitution of modern man acquires its elevation”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1968
Yasunari Kawabata
“for his narrative mastery, which with great sensibility expresses the essence of the Japanese mind”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1967
Miguel Angel Asturias
“for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1966
Shmuel Yosef Agnon
“for his profoundly characteristic narrative art with motifs from the life of the Jewish people”

Nelly Sachs
“for her outstanding lyrical and dramatic writing, which interprets Israel’s destiny with touching strength”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1965
Mikhail Aleksandrovich Sholokhov
“for the artistic power and integrity with which, in his epic of the Don, he has given expression to a historic phase in the life of the Russian people”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1964
Jean-Paul Sartre
“for his work which, rich in ideas and filled with the spirit of freedom and the quest for truth, has exerted a far-reaching influence on our age”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1963
Giorgos Seferis
“for his eminent lyrical writing, inspired by a deep feeling for the Hellenic world of culture”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1962
John Steinbeck
“for his realistic and imaginative writings, combining as they do sympathetic humour and keen social perception”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1961
Ivo Andric
“for the epic force with which he has traced themes and depicted human destinies drawn from the history of his country”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1960
Saint-John Perse
“for the soaring flight and the evocative imagery of his poetry which in a visionary fashion reflects the conditions of our time”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1959
Salvatore Quasimodo
“for his lyrical poetry, which with classical fire expresses the tragic experience of life in our own times”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1958
Boris Leonidovich Pasternak
“for his important achievement both in contemporary lyrical poetry and in the field of the great Russian epic tradition”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1957
Albert Camus
“for his important literary production, which with clear-sighted earnestness illuminates the problems of the human conscience in our times”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1956
Juan Ramón Jiménez
“for his lyrical poetry, which in Spanish language constitutes an example of high spirit and artistical purity”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1955
Halldór Kiljan Laxness
“for his vivid epic power which has renewed the great narrative art of Iceland”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1954
Ernest Miller Hemingway
“for his mastery of the art of narrative, most recently demonstrated in The Old Man and the Sea, and for the influence that he has exerted on contemporary style”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1953
Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill
“for his mastery of historical and biographical description as well as for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1952
François Mauriac
“for the deep spiritual insight and the artistic intensity with which he has in his novels penetrated the drama of human life”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1951
Pär Fabian Lagerkvist
“for the artistic vigour and true independence of mind with which he endeavours in his poetry to find answers to the eternal questions confronting mankind”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1950
Earl (Bertrand Arthur William) Russell
“in recognition of his varied and significant writings in which he champions humanitarian ideals and freedom of thought”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1949
William Faulkner
“for his powerful and artistically unique contribution to the modern American novel”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1948
Thomas Stearns Eliot
“for his outstanding, pioneer contribution to present-day poetry”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1947
André Paul Guillaume Gide
“for his comprehensive and artistically significant writings, in which human problems and conditions have been presented with a fearless love of truth and keen psychological insight”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1946
Hermann Hesse
“for his inspired writings which, while growing in boldness and penetration, exemplify the classical humanitarian ideals and high qualities of style”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1945
Gabriela Mistral
“for her lyric poetry which, inspired by powerful emotions, has made her name a symbol of the idealistic aspirations of the entire Latin American world”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1944
Johannes Vilhelm Jensen
“for the rare strength and fertility of his poetic imagination with which is combined an intellectual curiosity of wide scope and a bold, freshly creative style”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1943
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section.

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1942
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section.

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1941
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section.

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1940
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section.

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1939
Frans Eemil Sillanpää
“for his deep understanding of his country’s peasantry and the exquisite art with which he has portrayed their way of life and their relationship with Nature”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1938
Pearl Buck
“for her rich and truly epic descriptions of peasant life in China and for her biographical masterpieces”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1937
Roger Martin du Gard
“for the artistic power and truth with which he has depicted human conflict as well as some fundamental aspects of contemporary life in his novel-cycle Les Thibault”

 

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1936

Eugene Gladstone O’Neill

“for the power, honesty and deep-felt emotions of his dramatic works, which embody an original concept of tragedy”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1935
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section.

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1934
Luigi Pirandello
“for his bold and ingenious revival of dramatic and scenic art”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1933
Ivan Alekseyevich Bunin
“for the strict artistry with which he has carried on the classical Russian traditions in prose writing”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1932
John Galsworthy
“for his distinguished art of narration which takes its highest form in The Forsyte Saga”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1931
Erik Axel Karlfeldt
“The poetry of Erik Axel Karlfeldt”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1930
Sinclair Lewis
“for his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create, with wit and humour, new types of characters”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1929
Thomas Mann
“principally for his great novel, Buddenbrooks, which has won steadily increased recognition as one of the classic works of contemporary literature”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1928
Sigrid Undset
“principally for her powerful descriptions of Northern life during the Middle Ages”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1927
Henri Bergson
“in recognition of his rich and vitalizing ideas and the brilliant skill with which they have been presented”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1926
Grazia Deledda
“for her idealistically inspired writings which with plastic clarity picture the life on her native island and with depth and sympathy deal with human problems in general”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1925
George Bernard Shaw
“for his work which is marked by both idealism and humanity, its stimulating satire often being infused with a singular poetic beauty”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1924
Wladyslaw Stanislaw Reymont
“for his great national epic, The Peasants”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1923
William Butler Yeats
“for his always inspired poetry, which in a highly artistic form gives expression to the spirit of a whole nation”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1922
Jacinto Benavente
“for the happy manner in which he has continued the illustrious traditions of the Spanish drama”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1921
Anatole France
“in recognition of his brilliant literary achievements, characterized as they are by a nobility of style, a profound human sympathy, grace, and a true Gallic temperament”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1920
Knut Pedersen Hamsun
“for his monumental work, Growth of the Soil”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1919
Carl Friedrich Georg Spitteler
“in special appreciation of his epic, Olympian Spring”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1918
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was allocated to the Special Fund of this prize section.

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1917
Karl Adolph Gjellerup
“for his varied and rich poetry, which is inspired by lofty ideals”

Henrik Pontoppidan
“for his authentic descriptions of present-day life in Denmark”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1916
Carl Gustaf Verner von Heidenstam
“in recognition of his significance as the leading representative of a new era in our literature”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1915
Romain Rolland
“as a tribute to the lofty idealism of his literary production and to the sympathy and love of truth with which he has described different types of human beings”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1914
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was allocated to the Special Fund of this prize section.

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1913
Rabindranath Tagore
“because of his profoundly sensitive, fresh and beautiful verse, by which, with consummate skill, he has made his poetic thought, expressed in his own English words, a part of the literature of the West”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1912
Gerhart Johann Robert Hauptmann
“primarily in recognition of his fruitful, varied and outstanding production in the realm of dramatic art”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1911
Count Maurice (Mooris) Polidore Marie Bernhard Maeterlinck
“in appreciation of his many-sided literary activities, and especially of his dramatic works, which are distinguished by a wealth of imagination and by a poetic fancy, which reveals, sometimes in the guise of a fairy tale, a deep inspiration, while in a mysterious way they appeal to the readers’ own feelings and stimulate their imaginations”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1910
Paul Johann Ludwig Heyse
“as a tribute to the consummate artistry, permeated with idealism, which he has demonstrated during his long productive career as a lyric poet, dramatist, novelist and writer of world-renowned short stories”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1909
Selma Ottilia Lovisa Lagerlöf
“in appreciation of the lofty idealism, vivid imagination and spiritual perception that characterize her writings”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1908
Rudolf Christoph Eucken
“in recognition of his earnest search for truth, his penetrating power of thought, his wide range of vision, and the warmth and strength in presentation with which in his numerous works he has vindicated and developed an idealistic philosophy of life”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1907
Rudyard Kipling
“in consideration of the power of observation, originality of imagination, virility of ideas and remarkable talent for narration which characterize the creations of this world-famous author”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1906
Giosuè Carducci
“not only in consideration of his deep learning and critical research, but above all as a tribute to the creative energy, freshness of style, and lyrical force which characterize his poetic masterpieces”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1905
Henryk Sienkiewicz
“because of his outstanding merits as an epic writer”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1904
Frédéric Mistral
“in recognition of the fresh originality and true inspiration of his poetic production, which faithfully reflects the natural scenery and native spirit of his people, and, in addition, his significant work as a Provençal philologist”

José Echegaray y Eizaguirre
“in recognition of the numerous and brilliant compositions which, in an individual and original manner, have revived the great traditions of the Spanish drama”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1903
Bjørnstjerne Martinus Bjørnson
“as a tribute to his noble, magnificent and versatile poetry, which has always been distinguished by both the freshness of its inspiration and the rare purity of its spirit”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1902
Christian Matthias Theodor Mommsen
“the greatest living master of the art of historical writing, with special reference to his monumental work, A history of Rome”

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1901
Sully Prudhomme
“in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart and intellect”

Wi-Fi Printing

The Dexter District Library now offers wi-fi printing compatible with your smartphone, tablet, or laptop!  For black and white, the price is $0.10 per page.  For full color, the price is $0.20 per page.  For directions on how to install the app, please click here.

Group Study Rooms

The Library has three group study rooms available on the second floor.  Groups may call ahead to reserve a room.  Reservations can be taken for the current week and the following week.  Every Monday, the next week opens up to reservations.

To reserve a group study room, please call 734-426-4477 and ask for the Adult Reference Desk.  For the study room policy, see attached:

Reading Groups

Library Director’s (Paul McCann) Group

Meetings are typically held on the third Monday of each month, September through June, at 7:30 p.m. unless otherwise posted.  Registration is required.  Contact Paul McCann at 734-426-4477 (ext 111) for further information.

Lisa Ryan’s Groups

Somewhere in Time Book Club

This history focused book discussion club meets the second Monday of every month from 7:00- 8:30 in the DDL lower level meeting room and will focus on different times and places in history.  This is a nonfiction reading group, but some quality historical fiction may also be included from time to time.

Registration is required.  Contact Lisa Ryan 734-426-4477 at (ext 119) for further information.

Better Off Read Book Club

This general reading book discussion club meets the third Thursday of every month from 1:00-2:30 in the DDL lower level meeting room. This is a general reading group and it will focus on a selection of books from many different genres.

Registration is required.  Contact Lisa Ryan 734-426-4477 at (ext 119) for further information.